11459 Mayfield Rd, Cleveland, OH 44106
Cleveland Ohio

Renovating Interior and Exterior Design With Us

Renovating Interior and Exterior Design With Us

Renovating Interior and Exterior Design With Us

Home

Industrial Design

Good design does not simply determine how an object looks, but also deals with a variety of equally challenging questions such as “How is it made? What does it cost? How well does it work? Is it difficult to use? Is it appealing? Does it better the life of its user? What are its selling points?” The visual form of product design is a truly interesting topic as it leads to more basic questions. Viktor’s work illustrates these issues and highlights the “secret history” of industrial design that goes beyond mere appearance. It demonstrates the complex invisible factors behind successful products – especially regarding physical and psychological variables that he likes to call “human factors.”

Because his clients were so pleased with his designs, he never wanted for work. Clients who saw one product wondered if he would like to turn his hand to something similar. Over the course of his career, this often led him far from his starting point. Pedal cars, for example, would lead to golf cart lawn mowers; printing presses would lead to consoles for electronic controls; bicycle headlights would lead to flashlights, which in turn would lead to prismatic lighting fixtures streetlights, and modular lighting systems. One of the startling things about Viktor’s career is the sheer number of objects that he designed and because of their popularity, the millions that were manufactured.

viktor_with_pedalCars-321x2 (19K)
No matter what kind of projects and artistic ventures Viktor has taken up, he always remains true to his vision and desire to meld beauty and practicality. He has worked in all media and on all types of projects, thereby cementing his place in American history and our everyday lives.

In 1972, at the age of 66, Viktor stopped accepting Industrial Design projects and devoted his time to teaching and building the Industrial Design program at the Cleveland Institute of Art.

About Us

The Viktor Schreckengost Foundation Mission, History and Summary of Current Activities The Viktor Schreckengost Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to: Conserving the artwork, sketches, and writings of Viktor Schreckengost (b.1906): award-winning artist, pioneer of modern Industrial Design, American patriot and master teacher Cataloging his life’s work and assuring its accessibility to students and scholars […]

Read More

About Viktor

Who is Viktor Schreckengost? The son of a commercial potter in Sebring, Ohio, Viktor Schreckengost learned the craft of sculpting in clay from his father. In the mid-1920s, he enrolled at the Cleveland School of Art (now the Cleveland Institute of Art, or CIA) to study cartoon making, but after seeing an exhibition at the […]

Read More

Contact Us

Hi There, We are looking forward to hearing from you. Please feel free to get in touch via the form below, we will get back to you as soon as possible. A Great Company Name 123 Main St, Warwick, RI 02889 718.555.0062 [contact-form][contact-field label=’Name’ type=’name’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Email’ type=’email’ required=’1’/][contact-field label=’Comment’ type=’textarea’ required=’1’/][/contact-form]

Read More

Home

Industrial Design

Good design does not simply determine how an object looks, but also deals with a variety of equally challenging questions such as “How is it made? What does it cost? How well does it work? Is it difficult to use? Is it appealing? Does it better the life of its user? What are its selling points?” The visual form of product design is a truly interesting topic as it leads to more basic questions. Viktor’s work illustrates these issues and highlights the “secret history” of industrial design that goes beyond mere appearance. It demonstrates the complex invisible factors behind successful products – especially regarding physical and psychological variables that he likes to call “human factors.”

Because his clients were so pleased with his designs, he never wanted for work. Clients who saw one product wondered if he would like to turn his hand to something similar. Over the course of his career, this often led him far from his starting point. Pedal cars, for example, would lead to golf cart lawn mowers; printing presses would lead to consoles for electronic controls; bicycle headlights would lead to flashlights, which in turn would lead to prismatic lighting fixtures streetlights, and modular lighting systems. One of the startling things about Viktor’s career is the sheer number of objects that he designed and because of their popularity, the millions that were manufactured.

viktor_with_pedalCars-321x2 (19K)
No matter what kind of projects and artistic ventures Viktor has taken up, he always remains true to his vision and desire to meld beauty and practicality. He has worked in all media and on all types of projects, thereby cementing his place in American history and our everyday lives.

In 1972, at the age of 66, Viktor stopped accepting Industrial Design projects and devoted his time to teaching and building the Industrial Design program at the Cleveland Institute of Art.